Butterflyblue

火曜日, 10月 12, 2004

I want to marry a 漫才師

...or become one. My friend S. and I were talking about this over the weekend when I visited her in Mie-ken. We decided that she would be the boke and I'd be the tsukkomi. It would be great. I would love to see a movie about a pair of non-Japanese women who try to succeed in Japanese manzai. Would that be a funny movie or what?
    I don't know much about manzai yet, I just think it's cool. My exposure to this two-person comedic form is limited to the 2001-2003 M-1 Grand Pris competitions I watched on DVD over the weekend. Hopefully by watching enough of them, I can decide on some manzaishi I like and go to see them live in Osaka. Here is the website where you can look up performance dates. I love Osaka.
    S. told me that once a pair of manzaishi went on the Larry King Live show in the U.S. and did their routine in English. It fell flat and they protested, "This is very funny in Japan!"
    Comedy is probably the hardest thing to translate.
    The "Shiritori Essay" book got a little boring, so I didn't finish it. Instead I'm reading "Juon," the novelization of a hit horror movie. It's very grotesque, but easy to read. I'm also watching "The Office," a British television comedy about a paper company, and playing Kingdom of Loathing. This is a refreshingly fun and addictive, free online game. I'm a Turtle Tamer.

8 Comments:

  • At 5:47 午後, Blogger Matt said…

    Where did you get The Office?! Can I borrow it once you're done?

    I just started reading the first Gundam novelisation after a friend told me that the first three are classics of Japanese sf. (Immediately after I bought it, I discovered that an English translation of all three has just been released. D'oh.)

     
  • At 10:20 午後, Blogger misa said…

    Wow!Do you want to marry a Manzaishi?I heard that recently more and more wemen want to have a relationship with or marry them.:)This is so competitive!
    What do you think can you translate``boke and tsukkomi`` into English?Seems it is very hard.
    A lot of my friends from foregin countries asked me to explain about it,but I couldn`t!

     
  • At 11:34 午前, Blogger homodachi said…

    I once heard an English speaker describe the main manzai comedic device as "the comedy of people yelling at each other." Was the DVD good?

    The "Shiritori Essay" book got a little boring, so I didn't finish it.I'm usually the type to finish most books I read, even if I have to plow miserably through a boring one, but somehow it's easier to give up with JP books (because incomprehension is such an easy excuse). ^^; Can you stop reading an English book in the middle?

     
  • At 11:45 午前, Anonymous 匿名 said…

    Matt - The DVD is PET format, so it works on computer DVD players but not regular DVD players in Japan. I have to watch it at Internet cafes or friends' houses for that reason. I ordered it from Amazon.co.uk. I could have ordered it from the American Amazon (it is not released in Japan), but American DVDs use a different region code. I thought that since the UK region code is the same as Japan it would work in my PlayStation DVD player, but it didn't. If you still want to borrow it, I might consider it! Give me a month or so to finish watching it and then I could send it to you if you promise to send it back. It's not hilariously funny, but it is funny in a dark, pathetic way, and the characters are good. I like British comedy and I miss it in Japan, so that's why I invested in this one.

     
  • At 1:05 午後, Blogger butterflyblue said…

    Misa, I'm not surprised that many women want to date manzaishi. 格好いいよ。 Boke is "the funny man" and tsukkomi is "the straight man" in English. Or you can just describe what they do: the boke acts stupid and the tsukkomi makes fun of him and hits him on the head. The tsukkomi tries to tell a "serious" story, but the boke always messes it up by doing the wrong thing. That's how I understand it, anyway.

     
  • At 1:54 午後, Blogger butterflyblue said…

    Homodachi - Hm. They don't yell as loudly as Sam Kinison, for example. Did the person who said that understand WHAT they were yelling? You could just as easily say that certain American stand-up comedians use "the comedy of yelling at the audience," but that observation could be made by someone who didn't understand a word of it.
    The DVDs were cool but not worth buying, just rent them at Tsutaya. There is a lot of fluff between acts (the judges' scoring and comments) that I just skipped. The acts themselves are only a few minutes long each. "Yakimeshi" from 2003 and "Nakagawa Ken" from 2001 were really funny. There will be manzai on TV around New Year's.
    I start books without finishing them all the time, in both English and Japanese. I'm often in the process of reading 2 or 3 books at once. When a book no longer holds my interest, I stop reading it right then. I don't believe in wasting my time with boring books. There are a couple exceptions to that, though. If I'm close to the end when I lose interest, I might just skim along to the end to see how it turns out. Or, if I borrowed a book from a friend, I might make more of an effort to finish it for their sake. Or, sometimes I finish reading a book I know is badly written out of idle curiosity and boredom. Generally, though, I believe life's too short to read bad books. During the time you waste finishing that bad book, you could be reading a really interesting book.
    One difference between my English and Japanese reading habits is that I don't really "skim" in Japanese. In English, before I give up on a book, I might just skim it thinking "yeah, whatever, okay," and not paying attention to any details to see if the plot gets any better. Then if I see any interesting scenes, I read those more closely. I guess this is probably an advanced reading technique that I haven't acquired yet in Japanese. I can skim hundreds of pages a day that way in English, but I couldn't do it in Japanese.

     
  • At 7:52 午後, Blogger Matt said…

    When I saw some Sesame Street back in Australia it made me think "huh, Bert's like a tsukkomi and Ernie's a boke". I guess one difference is that they can't be a bad influence, so there's no hitting or insulting. (Plenty of shouting though.)

    I wish I could see that Larry King performance. I wonder if maybe it went flat just because their delivery wasn't well-timed enough, as non-native speakers, or the translation was stiff. That kind of problem would kill the performance even if the actual content was hilarious in either culture.

    I've never consciously wished I were married to a manzaishi but now that I think about it I do tend to tsukkom girls, including ones I'm interested in, a lot. It comes from having two younger sisters, I think. (It's also probably why I hardly ever have a girlfriend)

    If you have to watch it on a computer, I'm out of luck -- my iMac's drive is basically worthless. But thanks for the offer!

    (Oh, yeah, as for reading -- I hate to consciously give up on a book, but since I am usually reading at least three or four at once, I can sort of put off reading one in favour of the others, then start new ones, and after a few months I've totally ditched the book without actually having admitted defeat. It's the best of both worlds!)

     
  • At 9:09 午前, Blogger butterflyblue said…

    If you have to watch it on a computer, I'm out of luck -- my iMac's drive is basically worthless. But thanks for the offer!Yeah, you have to watch it on a computer, which is my problem with it too. Too bad! They should release it in Japan! There is one Japanese review of it on the amazon.co.jp site, and they liked it!

    I've never consciously wished I were married to a manzaishi but now that I think about it I do tend to tsukkom girls, including ones I'm interested in, a lot. It comes from having two younger sisters, I think. (It's also probably why I hardly ever have a girlfriend)Boke/tsukkomi kankei is sexy...if your girlfriends don't appreciate that they're crazy! It can be a kind of flirting, which adds to the sex appeal of manzaishi I guess.

     

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